How hot does it get inside your car?


Recently I said to someone

“I believe the scientific basis of global warming is very simple: if you put more heat (energy) into something than comes out, the temperature will go up. A commonly shared experience we can all relate to is getting into your car on a 90-degree day only to find that the inside temperature is around 120-degrees, due to the trapped heat.”

I wanted to check my statement about the 120 degree Fahrenheit (48.9 degree C) temperature inside the car to see if it was true.  I used a small automated weather station to get the inside and outside air temperatures and an infrared thermometer to measure surface temperatures.  Here is what I found (in degrees C):

12:15 PM, Location Mayaguez, Puerto Rico, Sept. 22, 2014, 2001 Honda Accord, Black.

Air temperature outside 31.6 C

Air temperature inside car 49.1 C (My statement was very close!)

Surface temperatures inside car: Dashboard 88.9 C (192 F  !!!!), driver seat 50C, front floor 39 C, Radio 51.6 C, steering wheel 53 C, trunk floor 56.9 C.

Pavement outside of car 52.1

Grass area near car 33.9

My office chair 17.7 C.  🙂

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FINCA ALZAMORA WEATHER DATA AVAILABLE ONLINE


Today a new weather station was installed in the Finca Alzamora, UPRM campus, Mayaguez Puerto Rico.  Data from the weather station are available from two websites:  WeatherLink  or WeatherUnderground.  The WeatherUnderground site allows you to download archived data in a coma delimited text format that can be imported into Excel.  Data being collected include:  air temperature, dew point temperature, RH, wind speed and direction, solar radiation, UV index, soil moisture tension and soil temperature.  A value of the reference evapotranspiration is available on the WeatherLink page.  We are still working out a few kinks, but should have it running smoothly within a few days.

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The weather station was purchased with funds from the UPRM NOAA CREST Project.

How your smartphone could one day predict the weather


How your smartphone could one day predict the weather

The article suggests that with humidity and barometric pressure measurements alone, it would be possible to predict the weather using a network of cell phones.  I guess this approach would have to filter out data from a cell phone, for example, in an air conditioned building where the air is essentially dehumidified in the cooling process, or a cell phone in in an oil heated building during the winter in the northern U.S., where the air becomes extremely dry.  Anyhow, the idea is  interesting and might be applicable for many other types of sensors that could estimate, for example, solar energy, air quality, human stress levels, traffic patterns, etc..